Outback Queensland | Things to Do


Get a real taste of the Aussie hospitality in Outback Queensland. Climb to the top of Big Red in Birdsville, camp under the stars, stop at the pub for a yarn and explore spectacular gorges. Check out towns like Mount Isa, Longreach and Charleville, and take the 4WD on an off-road adventure. Soak up the history of the Outback, then celebrate with the locals at events like the Big Red Bash and Vision Splendid Outback Film Festival.

Dinosaurs and fossicking

There are treasures to be found in the red dirt of Outback Queensland. Fossick for precious stones in the Sapphire Gemfields, see ancient mammals preserved in limestone at the World Heritage-listed Riversleigh Fossil Sites and follow the path of Jurassic giants along the Dinosaur Trail – including 'Hughie', the seven-metre Muttaburrasaurus” in Hughenden.

Road tripping

You don’t need to be an expert off-roader to explore the legendary Queensland Outback and get a taste for life on the land. It’s connected by both sealed roads and dirt tracks, with most towns only 2-4 hours apart. Start planning your Outback drives.


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National parks and outdoors

The Outback’s not all desert. Explore the stunning gorges of the Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park and spend the night at the nearby Adels Grove campground. Hear currawongs call and look for turtles in the deep pools of the Porcupine Gorge National Park, or relax and stretch out in the Artesian Mud Baths at Eulo. You might also wish to scale the sandstone wilderness of Kroombit Tops National Park, wander through the maze of gorges in the Isla Gorge National Park or look for ancient rock art in Expedition National Park.

History

Founded more than 130 years ago, Longreach is the historic heart of Outback Queensland. Visit the Qantas Founders Museum to learn about the origins of Australia’s national carrier and walk through the heritage-listed hangars. At the Stockman’s Hall of Fame, hear the ancient stories of the Aboriginal people, explorers and farmers who built this fascinating region.

Station experiences

Meet some genuine Aussie characters in the Outback. Spend the night at a farm stay, see a working cattle station and have a yarn with one of the locals. At night, be captivated by an endless starry sky – with no city lights to distract you.

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Cosmos Centre and Observatory

Charleville, Murweh Area
From AU$10.00 - 65.00
Wow, Ooh ahh and Brilliant, are the words you hear as visitors view the incredible beauty of the Milky Way Galaxy, through the powerful Meade telescopes. Charleville's Cosmos Centre and Observatory is dedicated to ensuring visitors enjoy the wonder of the outback night sky.

Gregory Downs

Gregory Downs, Burke Area
The old Gregory Downs Hotel holds court as the centre of town society. Originally built to serve passengers on the coach run from Burketown, the hotel is in the historic village of Gregory Downs which accesses the perennially-flowing Gregory River.

Cheepie

Cheepie, Quilpie Area
Cheepie is the friendly 'ghost town' of the Outback. The township formed when the railway first came through in 1914 and gradually grew to have a police station, blacksmith, railway station, tent boarding houses, butcher shop, bakery and two vegetable gardens.

Muckadilla

Muckadilla, Maranoa Area
Travel some 40 kilometres west of Roma, along the Warrego Highway and discover the whistlestop town of Muckadilla, or 'Mucka' as the locals call it. Once home to the famous Muckadilla Baths, this town may lack the bustle of bigger towns, but not the hospitality.

Goovigen

Goovigen, Banana Area
Goovigen is a small rural village in the region’s northern farming heartland. A short distance north-west of Jambin off the Burnett Highway, fewer than 300 people live in the town. The streets of Goovigen are as neat as a pin and the heritage buildings have been either restored to their former glory or updated for present needs.

Mud Springs

Eulo, Paroo Area
Free Entry
The Mud Springs are located nine kilometres west of Eulo. The mud springs have evolved due to the underground pressure from the Great Artesian Basin, forcing mud through fissures in the ground. The mud springs are centuries old.

Baralaba

Baralaba, Banana Area
Old fashioned values and friendly townsfolk are the hallmarks of Baralaba. Those traits and a stubborn streak for sticking around. More than a century of economic upheaval has threatened the town on many an occasion, but Baralaba locals are a stoic lot.

Jourama Falls, Paluma Range National Park

Paluma, Charters Towers Area
Free Entry
A picturesque waterfall on Waterview Creek, lush rainforest and fragrant woodlands are nestled in the foothills of the Seaview Range and protected as part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Set up camp beside Waterview Creek and head off along the Jourama Falls track to the lookout over the awe-inspiring falls.

Moorrinya National Park

Hughenden, Flinders Area
Free Entry
This remote park has dry, flat plains criss-crossed by watercourses and covered in open eucalypt, paperbark and acacia woodlands and grasslands. Moorrinya is a wildlife refuge, protecting Australian icons such as kangaroos, koalas, emus and dingoes, as well as rare and threatened species such as the square-tailed kite, squatter pigeon and Julia Creek dunnart.

Bulloo River Walk

Quilpie, Quilpie Area
Free Entry
A stroll along the Bulloo River Walk is a tranquil way to appreciate the native flora and fauna of the Bulloo River Catchment. Signs, bearing information about the plant species, are located along the walk.
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